I am so fortunate

Yes. I really am.

I may well be a lady-in-waiting, on a long list for eye surgery, but I can still see. This is NOT a ‘pity me’ post, only an explanation. Once I wear my prescription sunglasses, I am legally covered to drive. driving for me is FREEDOM. I can go out, meet people and enjoy the outside world. Heck, I drove a 119 mile round trip to have lunch with Elly & George, last Saturday (their journey was a little longer).

In my Granny’s day she needed to have cataract surgery, but back then, you had to go blind before surgery was attempted. That was when I was a schoolgirl  in the early 1960s. She did not go blind, but could not read beyond the headlines in a newspaper, so reading books or going to the movies (flickering screens) were lost to her. The surgery that I now require would not have been available to her either.

Some days are better than others, the Macular hole in my right eye affects the vision I use when looking directly at something, for example when I’m reading or looking at the laptop screen, thus the lack of posting from me. i have no pain in my eye but the discomfort varies from day to day. There are days when I do not want to read. Anything.

I use WhatsApp for daily contact with Elly, either by way of my mobiile or on the laptop. She tells me that she knows which device I am using, by the number of typos. I realise how frustrating this can be for regular readers, but hopefully the situation will improve post-surgery.

Please have patience with this patient!

I found this fellow when we were out yesterday. I had to wait until I came home to see what the photo detail was like. I have no idea of who the sculptor was, but I liked the piece.

Hello dear!

Hello dear!

32 thoughts on “I am so fortunate

    1. Grannymar Post author

      Thanks, Gigi, it may well be a month or two away. I like the sculpture and it just reminded me I have a brooch like that!

      Reply
  1. Zambian Lady

    Inventors/scientists, etc who continually look for better treatment are to be commended for making the surgery possible before you completely lose your sight. hope your surgery goes well.

    Reply
  2. colonialist

    So frustrating when one needs a repair and has to go on a waiting list – so much for modern healthcare.
    Not as bad, I suppose, as when one is dying of something operable and they leave you to die a bit more before slotting you in …

    Reply
    1. Grannymar Post author

      I reallyt have little to worry about, it is fixable unlike a friend of mine who has been bedridden for at least twenty years and in and out of consciousness for months now. Like technology, modern medicine isa wonderful WHEN it works! Sometimes we are kinder to animals and don’t leave them to linger in pain.

      Reply
      1. colonialist

        That is tough. Like the 25-yr-old son of a close friend who last night, waiting to walk across the Esplanade, was hit by a glass pane blown out of a high building by the gale. Severed the spine completely. It was thought he will now be quadriplegic, but when visited in hospital this evening he says he still has the use of his arms and is quite upbeat about it.

        Reply
    1. Grannymar Post author

      As you know Ramana, I have had two cataracts replaced and a hip replaced. Everyone seemed surprised that I went into the hospital alone by taxi for the ‘hip hop’, But Elly was home from Italy before I was due for discharge. I had her full time for six weeks so that gave me a deadline to become independent. Perhaps if she lived next door I may not have tried so hard.

      Reply
    1. Grannymar Post author

      Tilly, in my book it is the only way to live. Nobody wants a misery guts always moaning.

      Reply
    1. Grannymar Post author

      Dianne, I hope your recovery for yesterday’s surgery is swift and with good news.

      Reply
  3. cedar51

    currently i’m out of action with a busted wrist – simple originally until a bone or 2 decided to shift off it’s rightful [nope leftful] perch – apparently i have also slipped off the sector that fixes that & at this point it won’t be known if i will have a ‘twist’ or similar when lefty is released from it’s stark white prison [plaster cast] – so i understand how you feel right now…safe journeys

    Reply
    1. Grannymar Post author

      Oh Cathy, I am sorry to hear about your wrist, I hope it is sorted satisfactorally for you.

      Reply
  4. Bev

    We really live in n awesome world. Have had lens implants in both eyes. I too think of of those in the past that suffered not seeing. Imagine the first person to have this operation. I am blessed to see our beautiful world. My DH has had one hip replaced and will have his other hip replaced in the fall. We say we are bionic, ha. Take care, know you will do fine. Confidence in your doctors is a plus.
    I love the sculpture. He seems to have a personaluty.

    Reply
    1. Grannymar Post author

      Twenty minutes for each eye, six months apart, and I was awake for both of them! Very different from the early attempts (http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/579850_2) Only read if you have a strong stomach! I am bionic too. Remember to be careful in lightening storms, the metal acts as a conductor.

      Reply
    1. Grannymar Post author

      John, I have been dealing with ‘ill’ people since I was nine years of age, now I take it in my stride. Everyone has their turn and this is another onew of mine!

      Reply
    1. Grannymar Post author

      Thank you Gerlinde, My surgery will be for a Macular hole and not cornea replacement.

      Reply
  5. wisewebwoman

    Do you have an approximate date for this GM? Good on you for looking on the bright side. We are the lucky ones and I keep reminding myself of this. Vertical and driving. Driving is so important to me too 😀
    XO
    WWW

    Reply
    1. Grannymar Post author

      I did phone the hospital the other day and with our July holidays coming up, it may well be the month of August. Driving is important for me, eight months off driving because of blackouts caused by blood pressure medication was more than enough for me.

      Reply
    1. Grannymar Post author

      Nick, I am half expecting it to be in August and anything earlier will be a bonus!

      Reply
  6. shackman

    I’ll be starting the process to have cataract surgery myself in a couple of weeks. The only impediment to the time frame over here is having the money to cover my share since Medicare does not cover it all. It’ll be nice to be able to see clearly – especially at night.

    Reply
    1. Grannymar Post author

      Shackman, I bet you will notice colour returning to your world post surgery. I had both cataracts replaced and did not realise how much my world had faded It is so easy these days – twenty minutes and you are being wheeled out for a cup of tea or coffee. All the best!

      Reply
    1. Grannymar Post author

      Nancy, I will admit to feeliing a little frustrated at times, but there others more in need than I am. My day will come.

      Reply

Leave a Reply to shackman Cancel reply